QRP frequencies

QRP frequencies.

This is my interpretation of the QRP frequencies.  I thought this would be of interest to readers.  But, first of all – what is QRP?  QRP operation refers to transmitting at reduced power while attempting to maximize transmission range.  It is generally accepted that for QRP operation, transmitter power should be limited to 5 watts for morse or data modes and just 10 watts pep for voice.  QRP operation is a specialized pursuit within amateur radio.

Other than the military, amateur radio operators are the only users of the radio spectrum that are permitted to change frequency. This means that as licensed amateur radio operators, we do not have to restrict ourselves to stipulated channels. Having said that, each amateur radio band covers a wide range of frequencies and many applications for amateur radio in each band involve automated equipment such as repeaters, satellites, and beacons. For these reasons, it has become general practice to specify ranges of frequencies within each band for different modes of operation.  In the case of QRP, other operators are encouraged to avoid using frequencies around the “centre of activity” in the following bands.

160-meter band

  • 1,836 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

80-meter band

  • 3,560 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 3,690 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

40-meter band

  • 7,030 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 7,090 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

30-meter band

  • 10,116 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity

20-meter band

  • 14,060 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 14,285 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

17-meter band

  • 18,086 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 18,130 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

15-meter band

  • 21,060 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 21,285 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

12-meter band

  • 24,906 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 24,950 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

10-meter band

  • 28,060 kHz Telegraphy QRP Centre of Activity
  • 28,360 kHz SSB QRP Centre of Activity

To see all band frequencies as published by the RSGB, follow this link:-  https://rsgb.services/public/bandplans/html/rsgb_band_plan_2022.htm


What is amateur radio?

Amateur radio is a popular technical hobby and volunteer public service. As a licensed amateur radio operator, you are permitted to transmit and receive radio signals on frequency bands allocated for use by amateur radio amateurs. Amateur radio operators use these designated bands of radio frequencies for non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communications. A 1910 announcement by the then HM Postmaster General licensed “experimental wireless”, which still uniquely gives radio amateurs the ability to innovate without commercial or statutory controls even in the closely regulated environment of the 21st century. Amateur radio is the only hobby governed by international treaty.

Amateur radio operators use amateur radio bands for a variety of purposes:

  • Contacting people all over the world by radio often leads to developing international friendships,
  • Competing in international competitions to test the effectiveness of their equipment and their skill as radio operators,
  • Technical experimentation — many of the leaps forward in radio technology have been initiated by radio amateurs,
  • Communication through amateur space satellites or with the International Space Station (which carries an amateur radio station),
  • Providing communications at times of emergencies and undertaking exercises to maintain that capability.

There is no better way to explore the fascinating world of radio communications than by becoming a radio amateur.

You can also find out more through the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) https://rsgb.org/


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